Today clinic was at Hamunoywa (don’t ask us to pronounce this!). We felt fortunate to arrive on time as we passed two large trucks overturned in ditches due to the heavy rainfalls Kenya has been having. I don’t know how the people live with this daily with using bikes, motorcycles or walking along these muddy slippery roads. We arrived to a lineup which we weren’t surprised as this is one of our busier clinics. We were looking forward to today as this is the community which Tembo Kenya built composting latrines for boys and girls at the school with funding from your donations to CNFA. You will see by the pictures the comparison of old and new. Composting toilets require upkeep which is why it is essential to choose a community such as Hamonoywa which has the capacity to provide the manpower to sustain them. We also walked down to the protected springs with the stairs that were built to assist those carrying water from the stream. Even with these stairs, I can’t imagine how students to carry heavy pails up the muddy slope back to the school. However, this community is strong and supportive and wonderful to work with. You will see the picture of student standing behind their lunch – corn and beans drying on the ground which students will prepare for others. Unfortunately this is only for students who can pay so still many may go hungry. This became evident at clinic as we had many sick children with 7 patients requiring medical attention. One was a lady who was seen at the clinic but then fainted on the road. Six of these patients were acute malaria and one was query typhoid. It is convenient that Sister Carmen runs a clinic down the road with little costs so we sent all of these 7 patients there. We were able to provide sexual health education in the school today for 50 girls who proudly hung their bags over their shoulders (see pics). I also ran a sexual health group beside the clinic which I thoroughly enjoyed when one baby started sucking another baby’s thumb. I laughed so hard which made the women laugh (at me!). Altogether we saw 749 patients and dewormed the school. It was a great day though very tiring. The power is off and on all evening due to the rain so I’m hoping you will receive this post! We all cannot believe tomorrow is the last day. We hope you’ve lived our experience through this blog!

One Response to Thursday, May 8, 2014

  1. LINDA says:

    A short story that emulates your work:
    A man walking along a beach saw what he thought was a woman dancing. As he approached he saw that the woman was throwing star fish back into the sea.
    “Why are you doing this”, he asked the woman who explained that since the tide was out the star fish would die.
    “Woman, he replied, there is hundreds of miles of beach with star fish, you cannot save them all”.
    The woman just smiled and threw another star fish into the sea, ” I can save that one”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Want to Donate?

Anything can help. No Donation is too small.